What You Need to Know about a Medicaid Asset Protection Trust (MAPT)
What You Need to Know about a Medicaid Asset Protection Trust (MAPT)

What You Need to Know about a Medicaid Asset Protection Trust (MAPT)

What You Need to Know about a Medicaid Asset Protection Trust (MAPT).

Moving into a nursing home can be expensive, costing you $12,000 to $15,000 a month or more. This expense can quickly wipe out your life savings. Medicaid will pick up the bill for you, if your income and assets are low enough to qualify for Medicaid benefits. The problem is you typically have to be nearly destitute, before you can qualify for Medicaid.

If you put your assets into a Medicaid Asset Protection Trust, however, you might be able to qualify for Medicaid, even if your assets exceed the limit. Here is what you need to know about a Medicaid Asset Protection Trust (MAPT).

Medicaid Income and Asset Limits

Eligibility for Medicaid varies by state. In general, you must have little or no income and few countable assets. Each state also has non-economic requirements, such as age, disability and household size, depending on your circumstances.

Medicaid does not count all of your assets toward the asset limit. For example, if you or your spouse live in your primary house, Medicaid considers the home an exempt asset. The value of that property does not count toward your state’s asset limit. There are limits on the amount of equity that does not count. The current limit in New York is $858,000.00. Limits vary from state to state.

Additional examples of assets that can be exempt, include one car, term life insurance, household furnishings, clothing, wedding and engagement rings and other personal items. Medicaid does not count prepaid funeral and burial plans or life insurance policies with little cash value toward the limit.

Medicaid does count these things toward the asset limit:

  • Cash
  • Bank accounts
  • Investments
  • Vacation homes
  • Retirement accounts not yet in payout status (only in some states)

These are the general guidelines. Your state’s treatment of assets might differ.

How a MAPT Works

When you put your assets into a Medicaid Asset Protection Trust (MAPT), Medicaid does not count those things toward the asset limit. You do not own those items – the trust does. Medicaid does not count an asset that does not belong to you. The trust can protect the assets for distribution one day to your beneficiaries.

There are different flavors of trusts that protect an asset from being counted for Medicaid. Different attorneys call them different things. Please note that a “Medicaid Asset Protection Trust” can also go by the name of “Medicaid Planning Trust;” “Home Protection Trust;” “Medicaid Trust;” “Asset Protection Trust,” and “Irrevocable Trust.” to name a few titles. Make sure that the trust you select is Medicaid-compliant.

Trusts that do not safeguard against Medicaid are most revocable living trusts, family trusts, funeral trusts (some irrevocable funeral trusts do), and qualifying income trusts (QITs, also called Miller trusts) are not Medicaid-compliant. They will not protect your assets, if you want to be eligible for Medicaid to pay for a nursing home.

Essential Aspects of MAPTs

MAPTs are sophisticated estate planning documents. Here are a few of the highlights of these documents:

  • You cannot create a MAPT and immediately apply for Medicaid. You will have to wait at least five years (2.5 years in California) before you apply for Medicaid, after setting up a MAPT. If you apply for Medicaid before the “look back” period expires, you could face harsh financial penalties.
  • You are the grantor of your trust. You state might use a different term, like the trust-maker or settlor. There is legal debate as to whether your spouse can be the trustee of your MAPT, but your adult child or another relative can be.
  • The trust must be irrevocable. Once signed, you can never change or cancel the trust. You can never own those assets again. If you create a revocable trust, Medicaid will count all the assets in the trust toward the asset limit, because you still have control over the assets.
  • The trustee must follow the instructions of the trust. No funds of the trust can get used for your benefit.
  • A MAPT protects your assets from Medicaid estate recovery. Without a MAPT, after you die, the state could seek reimbursement from your estate for all the money they paid for your long-term care.
  • While a Miller trust will not protect your assets, it can protect some of your income, if your income exceeds the limit for Medicaid. Used with a MAPT, many people can qualify for Medicaid to help pay for the nursing home, even if their assets and income exceed the eligibility limits.
  • The rules for MAPTs vary from one state to the next.

The regulations are different in every state. You should talk to an elder law attorney in your area to see how your state varies from the general law of this article.

References:

American Council on Aging. “How Medicaid Planning Trusts Protect Assets and Homes from Estate Recovery.” (accessed December 19, 2019) https://www.medicaidplanningassistance.org/asset-protection-trusts/

American Council on Aging. “How to Spend Down Income and/or Assets to Become Medicaid Eligible.” (accessed December 19, 2019) https://www.medicaidplanningassistance.org/medicaid-spend-down/

 

The Medicaid Medically Needy “Spend-Down Program” – What You Need to Know
The Medicaid Medically Needy "Spend-Down Program" - What You Need to Know

The Medicaid Medically Needy “Spend-Down Program” – What You Need to Know

The Medicaid Medically Needy “Spend-Down Program” – What You Need to Know.

If you’ve been denied Medicaid benefits because you have too many assets or too high an income, don’t give up. There are available programs that may enable you to qualify for Medicaid benefits, despite this setback. Each state may offer different programs, and the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has added new ways to obtain coverage. This article addresses the “spend down program” offered in every state.

Medicaid Spend-Down Program – The Basics

To qualify for Medicaid benefits, your income and assets may not exceed a certain amount set by law. If these items do exceed the legal limits, you may still qualify after a spend-down period. The medically needy spend-down program helps individuals over the age of 65, and some younger individuals with disabilities. To be eligible for this program, you must not be receiving public financial assistance.

Exempt & Non-Exempt Assets

It is not necessary to sell off everything you own to qualify for the spend-down program. You may keep a certain amount of “exempt assets,” such as the home you live in, your car (used for transportation), household furniture, clothes, jewelry and other personal items. None of these assets affect your eligibility, regardless of their value (unless you have high equity, say $1 million in an asset, in which case you may need to spend that down).

Non-exempt assets, on the other hand, do affect your eligibility for the spend-down program. These assets include bank accounts, stocks, investments, and cash over $2,000 for an individual or a higher amount for a married couple.

Amount of Income You Can Have to Apply

It does not matter how much income you have when you apply. The more income you have, though, the more medical expenses you must incur before your coverage can start. The way you spend down this income is by spending it on medical expenses, until you reach the income requirements for Medicaid. Interestingly, you just need to incur medical costs. You don’t have to actually pay them.

In addition, you can pay down accrued debt to spend down your income. Therefore, paying down credit card bills, car payments, or mortgage debt can count towards your spend down. Another tactic you can use, is to pay excess monthly amounts on old medical bills.

Seeking Professional Assistance

Medicaid programs are different in each state, and the laws change frequently. If done wrong, you could end up incurring penalties instead of obtaining benefits. It may be a good idea to enlist the help of a Medicaid lawyer or elder law attorney to walk you through the process in a way that will avoid these types of penalties.

Resources:

National Council on Aging. “Benefits Checkup” (Accessed November 28, 2019) https://www.benefitscheckup.org/fact-sheets/factsheet_medicaid_la_medicaid_spend_down/#/

U.S. News and World Report. “How a Medicaid Spend Down Works.” (Accessed 28, 2019) https://money.usnews.com/money/retirement/baby-boomers/articles/how-a-medicaid-spend-down-works

 

Q & A – Medicaid for Nursing Home Care
Medicaid for Nursing Home Care

Q & A – Medicaid for Nursing Home Care

Q & A – Medicaid for Nursing Home Care.

As we approach our third act, new terminology comes into our daily lives that we may have heard before, but maybe never gave much thought to. Terms like Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security, Long-Term Care, and so on, can become sources of anxiety, if we don’t truly understand them. Therefore, today we’re answering some of the fundamental questions about Medicaid for nursing home care, in the hopes that we can alleviate at least one source of anxiety for you.

Question #1 – What is Medicaid?

Medicaid is a state and federal government-funded program that provides medical services to financially eligible individuals. Unlike Medicare, you do not have to be elderly to qualify for Medicaid, and many elderly individuals receive Medicaid benefits, including nursing home care. Every state administers its own version of Medicaid. For more information on Medicaid programs in your state, visit the Medicaid website, and select your state.

Question #2 – What are Medicaid’s basic financial eligibility requirements for nursing home care?

To determine your eligibility for nursing home benefits under Medicaid, the government will look at your income and resources in a given month to ensure you are within the legal limits for Medicaid benefits. To qualify for Medicaid, your monthly income must be less than the Medicaid rate for nursing home care, plus your typical monthly healthcare expenses. If you are eligible, you are allowed to keep $70 of your income for personal use. The rest is taken to pay for your care.

Question #3 – What is the Medically Needy Program under Medicaid?

For individuals that may exceed the financial limits to receive Medicaid, they may still qualify to receive Medicaid benefits under the medically needy program. This program allows individuals with medical needs to “spend down” their income to acceptable rates, by paying for medical care for which they have no insurance. For individuals over the age of 65, states are required to allow you to spend down your income regardless of medical necessity.

Question #4 – What resources can we have if my spouse is applying for Medicaid?

When a married couple applies for Medicaid, both spouses’ income and resources are included in the qualifying calculations. You may have all of the “exempt” resources, like an automobile and a house, along with one non-exempt item that does not exceed a set value, such as cash or investments. Once your spouse qualifies for Medicaid, after one year, all excess income and resources must be transferred to the non-Medicaid-benefitted individual. That spouse may also accrue income and resources over and above the limits that Medicaid imposes on the benefitted spouse.

More information can be found on the Medicaid website, including requirements and benefits information for the state in which you reside.

If you have any questions about your situation, please contact the office to speak with me.

References:

Medicaid.gov. (Accessed November 28, 2019) https://www.medicaid.gov/medicaid/index.html

 

Medicaid Eligibility for Long-Term Care – The Basics
Medicaid Eligibility for Long-Term Care - The Basics

Medicaid Eligibility for Long-Term Care – The Basics

Medicaid Eligibility for Long-Term Care – The Basics.

Medicaid is a federal- and state-funded healthcare program that is independently operated by each state. Generally, Medicaid programs are for lower-income individuals of any age, provided they meet specific requirements. Because Medicaid has become the primary source of funding for long-term and nursing home care, this article explains basic eligibility requirements for elderly individuals seeking assistance.

Medicaid Eligibility Factors

To qualify for Medicaid as an older individual, you must meet certain criteria. These criteria are based on:

  • Age
  • Citizenship
  • Income
  • Disability
  • Household size
  • Applicant’s role in the household

For purposes of this article, the age requirement would generally be 65. Younger individuals may qualify, if they possess specific disabilities.

While each state differs, Medicaid is only available to U.S. citizens, state residents, permanent residents, or legal immigrants.

Income and Assets

Generally speaking, if you make under 100-200% of the federal poverty level and are elderly, you will likely qualify for your state’s Medicaid program. In certain circumstances, if you make less than 133% of the federal poverty level, you may also be eligible. As of 2020, the federal poverty levels are as follows:

People in Household 2020 Poverty Guideline
(48 Contiguous States and Washington DC)
2020 Poverty Guideline
(Alaska)
2020 Poverty Guideline
(Hawaii)
1 $12,490 $15,600 $14,380
2 $16,910 $21,130 $19,460
3 $21,330 $26,660 $24,540
4 $25,750 $32,190 $29,620
more add $4,420 each add $5,530 each Add $5,080 each

 

In general, a married couple’s incomes are counted separately, if only one spouse is applying for Medicaid. In that case, the non-applicant is allotted some of the applicant spouse’s income. This is referred to as the Minimum Monthly Maintenance Needs Allowance and enables the non-applicant spouse to continue living at home, while their spouse is in a nursing home.

To determine eligibility, the state will look at your modified adjusted gross income. This is your taxable income, minus certain deductions like:

  • individual retirement contributions
  • tax-exempt interest
  • non-taxable Social Security benefits

In addition to income, the state will look at your assets. Assets are divided into exempt (“non-countable”) and non-exempt (“countable”). Typically, a home, vehicle and furnishings are exempt. A couple’s assets are counted together, and the government will look at any asset transfers for a period of up to five-years in New York (two and a half in California). This is called the “Lookback Period.”

Applying for Medicaid

You can apply for Medicaid at any time. The state has 45-days to approve or deny your application and 90-days, if you are disabled. To apply, you will need, at a minimum:

  • Your birth certificate or driver’s license
  • Recent pay stubs or tax returns
  • Bank statements
  • Proof of address (for example, a lease, utility bill, credit card statements or mortgage bill)
  • Medical records (to prove disability)

To check your state’s guidelines, visit the Medicaid Website. In New York, you could make an appointment to speak with Frank Bruno, Jr. to see what your options may be.

Resources:

Policygenius. “A state-by-state guide to Medicaid: Do I qualify?” (Accessed November 29, 2019) https://www.policygenius.com/blog/a-state-by-state-guide-to-medicaid/

American Council on Aging. “Medicaid Eligibility: 2019 Income, Asset & Care Requirements for Nursing Homes & Long-Term Care” (Accessed November 29, 2019)  https://www.medicaidplanningassistance.org/medicaid-eligibility/

The Finance Buff. “2018 2019 2020 Federal Poverty Levels (FPL) For ACA Health Insurance”  (Accessed November 29, 2019)  https://thefinancebuff.com/federal-poverty-levels-for-obamacare.html

Medicaid Eligibility for Long-Term Care – The Basics

 

How to Spot Problems at Nursing Homes
How to Spot Problems at Nursing Homes

How to Spot Problems at Nursing Homes

How to Spot Problems at Nursing Homes.

The best time to shop for a nursing home, is when you do not need one. If you wait until you can no longer safely or comfortably live on your own, you probably will not be in a position to do a lot of legwork to investigate facilities. Do your research well ahead of time, so you know the nursing homes in your area that provide high-quality care and, more importantly, the ones that have significant problems.

How to Spot Problems at Nursing Homes. As you evaluate and compare facilities, you need to know how to spot problems at nursing homes. The marketing brochure, website and lobby might be lovely, but you should base your decision about a long-term care facility on much more data than those things. Here are some tips on how to dig for possible problems at nursing homes:

  • Online search. Check out the nursing home’s website to get an overview of the services it offers and the industry affiliations or certifications it has. Look at the daily menus to see if the meals are nutritious and have enough variety. Most people would not enjoy eating the same main course two or three times a week. Look at the activities calendar to see if you would be happy with the planned social events. On some websites, you can view the floor plans of the resident rooms.
  • Ask your primary care doctor to name a few facilities he would recommend for his parents, and those where he would not want them to live.
  • Local Office on Aging location. Every state has an Office on Aging. Contact them to get as much information as you can about safety records, injuries, deaths, regulation violations and complaints about local nursing homes.
  • Your state’s Long-term Care Ombudsman (LCO). Every state also has an Ombudsman who investigates allegations against nursing homes and advocates for the residents. Your state LCO should have a wealth of information about the facilities in your area.
  • State Online Database or Reporting System. Some states have online databases or collect reports about nursing homes.
  • Medicare’s Nursing Home Compare website. Medicare maintains an online tool, Nursing Home Compare, that provides detailed information on nursing homes. Every nursing home that gets any funding from Medicare or Medicaid is in this database. You can enter the name of a specific nursing home or search for all the facilities in a city or zip code. The tool includes information about abuse at long-term care facilities. On the webpage, you can explore the Special Focus Facility section to find nursing homes with a history of problems.
  • Word of mouth. Ask your friends, relatives and neighbors to recommend a quality nursing home. Personal experience can be extremely valuable.
  • Make a short list of the top candidates. After you collect as much information as you reasonably can, narrow your options down to four or five facilities that best meet your needs and preferences.
  • Visit your top choices. There is no substitute for going to a nursing home and checking it out in person. Pay attention to the cleanliness of the place throughout, not just in the lobby. Give the facility the “sniff” test. Determine whether they use products to mask unpleasant odors, instead of cleaning thoroughly. See whether the residents are well-groomed and wearing fresh, clean clothes. Observe the interaction of the staff with the residents. Notice whether people who need assistance at mealtime, get the help they need without having to wait.
  • Take online reviews with a grain of salt. Fake reviews are all over the internet. If you see a nursing home with only a few reviews, and they are all five stars, be skeptical.

Once you gather this information, you will be ready in the event you need to stay in a nursing home for a short recuperation from surgery or longer term.

References:

AARP. “Finding a Nursing Home: Don’t Wait Until You Need One to Do the Research.” (accessed December 5, 2019) https://www.aarp.org/caregiving/basics/info-2019/finding-a-nursing-home.html

CMS. “Find a nursing home.” (accessed December 5, 2019) https://www.medicare.gov/nursinghomecompare/search.html

 

What Should I Know About Medicaid?
What Should I Know About Medicaid?

What Should I Know About Medicaid?

What Should I Know About Medicaid? Medicaid is the federal program that gives healthcare benefits to those who cannot afford them. Many people who end up requiring long-term care can pay for it out of their own their own assets, at least initially.

However, because long-term care expenses are so astronomical, many people end up accessing Medicaid benefits, after their own assets have been depleted.

The Medicaid program can help with paying for home care, assisted living, and nursing home care, explains Insurance News Net’s recent article, “Medicaid planning.”

It would be great if people would plan to qualify for Medicaid before they become completely broke, which would preserve their children’s inheritance.

For those who are thinking of transferring all of their assets to their children to qualify for Medicaid, the government has already thought of that. If you gift any assets to your children, you must wait 60 months from the date you gave the gift before becoming Medicaid eligible. However, there are perfectly legal strategies that a senior can use to become eligible for Medicaid, while still keeping considerable assets.

That’s why you should talk to an elder law or Medicaid planning attorney. These practitioners specialize in helping people qualify for Medicaid benefits far in advance of their assets becoming depleted.

Assets may be freely transferred between spouses to help gain eligibility for a spouse that needs care.

There are also many assets that are exempt for purposes of gaining eligibility. This includes a primary residence, rental property, certain IRAs and most vehicles.

It’s also important to remember that a person can enter into contracts with family members to provide care in exchange for a fee, without a 60-month look back.

With the guidance and planning from qualified legal counsel, seniors who require long-term care can get free government healthcare, while preserving assets for their heirs.

What Should I Know About Medicaid? Please contact an experienced Medicaid planning or elder law attorney for additional information.

Reference: Insurance News Net (September 29, 2019) “Medicaid planning”

 

Why an Attorney Should Help with a Medicaid Application
 Why an Attorney Should Help with a Medicaid Application.

Why an Attorney Should Help with a Medicaid Application

Why an Attorney Should Help with a Medicaid Application.

Elder law attorneys can be very helpful when planning for Medicaid coverage, and they can save money in the long run, ensuring that you (or a loved one) get the best care. Instead of waiting to see how wrong the process can get, says The Middletown Press, it’s best to “Use a lawyer for Medicaid planning” right from the start. Here’s why.

Conflict of interests. When a nursing home refers a family to people for preparing the Medicaid application, very often the person has dual loyalties: to the nursing home who refers them the work, and to the family who will pay them a fee for help with applying for benefits. Whose interests comes first?

Everyone wants the Medicaid application to be successful, but let’s be realistic. It’s in the nursing home’s best interest that the resident pays privately for as long as possible, before going on Medicaid. It’s in the resident or family member’s best interest to protect the family’s assets for care for the resident’s spouse or family.

Why an Attorney Should Help with a Medicaid Application. An attorney has a duty of loyalty only to her client. She also has an ethical and professional responsibility to put her client’s needs ahead of her own.

Saving money is possible. Nursing homes in some areas cost as much as $15,000 a month. While every market and every law practice is different, it would be unusual for legal fees to cost more than a month in the facility. With an experienced attorney’s help, you might save more than her fee in long-term care and probate cost. Most attorneys will consult with new clients at little or no cost to determine what they need and what they want to achieve before paying a larger fee.

The benefit of experience. It’s all well and good to read through pages of online information, but nothing beats the years of experience that an attorney who practices in this area can bring to the table. Any professional in any field develops knowledge of the ins and outs of an area and applying for Medicaid is no different. Without experience, it’s hard to know how it all works.

Peace of mind from a reliable, reputable source. Today we hear a lot about “FOMO,” or fear of missing out. Consulting with an experienced attorney about a Medicaid application will help you avoid years of wondering, if there was more you could have done to help yourself or your loved one.

There are multiple opportunities for nursing home residents to preserve assets for themselves and spouses, children and grandchildren, particularly when a family member has special needs. However, here’s a key fact: if you wait for the last minute, there will be far less options than if you begin planning long before there’s a need to apply for Medicaid.

Reference: The Middletown Press (July 29, 2019) “Use a lawyer for Medicaid planning”

Why an Attorney Should Help with a Medicaid Application.

What’s the Difference Between a Life Estate and an Irrevocable Trust?
What's the Difference Between a Life Estate and an Irrevocable Trust?

What’s the Difference Between a Life Estate and an Irrevocable Trust?

What’s the Difference Between a Life Estate and an Irrevocable Trust? Investopedia’s recent article asks “Life Estate vs. Irrevocable Trust: What’s the Difference?” The article explains that a life estate and an irrevocable trust are two different ways to make certain that assets are transferred to the right party. Each of these has advantages and disadvantages.

A life estate that’s used to gift property will divide the ownership between the giver and receiver. Some parents create a life estate to reduce their assets to qualify for Medicaid. While the parent still has some interest in the property, Medicaid doesn’t count it as an asset. A life estate lasts for the lifetime of its creator and it prohibits the selling of the asset, without the permission of its beneficiaries. Therefore, a parent can’t sell a home without the permission of his children, if they are beneficiaries of the life estate.

If you’re attempting to be eligible for Medicaid and are concerned that your home will disqualify you, ask your estate planning or Medicaid planning attorney about an irrevocable trust. With this trust, if a husband and wife both own a home, the husband can transfer his portion to his wife, and his Medicaid eligibility won’t include the home.

There must be a five-year gap between the creation of the trust and the application for Medicaid. If there isn’t, those funds will be counted as part of existing assets when determining Medicaid eligibility. Therefore, you can’t start an irrevocable trust right before you apply for Medicaid, if you want to receive those benefits.

One negative of an irrevocable trust is that the founder of the trust relinquishes any rights he has to the home. However, the beneficiary of the trust can’t sell the home, unless he or she is also named as a trustee. Once an irrevocable trust has been created, the trustee can’t take back control of the trust.

Remember that a life estate and an irrevocable trust aren’t always mutually exclusive. It’s possible to place an asset (like a home) in an irrevocable trust and keep a life estate. In that case, you’re irrevocably transferring ownership of your house to the trust. However, you still keep control. In this case, you are permitted to sell the home, remodel, or rent out a room, but the house itself—or the sales proceeds from it—would remain in the irrevocable trust.

In this situation, a parent would also not risk giving their children part of the tax liability that is associated with owning a home. The parent would keep more personal control over the house and wouldn’t need their child’s permission to sell the home. This may be the best option because it would still allow the parents to apply for Medicaid and not have the property count in their assets, but he or she would remain the sole decision-maker for the house.

What’s the Difference Between a Life Estate and an Irrevocable Trust? Both have their pros and cons, but a combination of the two can often be the best answer. Make no moves either way, without the advice of an experienced elder law attorney.

Reference: Investopedia (June 16, 2019) “Life Estate vs. Irrevocable Trust: What’s the Difference?”

 

Use This Checklist When Visiting Assisted Living Facilities
Use This Checklist When Visiting Assisted Living Facilities

Use This Checklist When Visiting Assisted Living Facilities

Use This Checklist When Visiting Assisted Living Facilities. When you are trying to find an assisted living community for yourself or a loved one, you need to do your homework to find at least three candidates that meet all the needs of the future resident. After you have narrowed your search down to those facilities, you should visit each one with the person who will be living there. Know what you want to look for before you visit the first center, so you will get all the information you need from every facility.

It is easy to get overwhelmed in the process of finding the right assisted living community. To help you in this quest, use this checklist when visiting assisted living facilities.

  1. First impressions count. Pay close attention to your initial thoughts and feelings about the center as you approach and enter. Your instincts often pick up on “micro-symptoms” that can indicate a problem, even before you notice the issue itself.
  2. Try to see down the road. Visualize yourself or your loved one actually living at the assisted living community. Ask yourself if you would be happy there. Pay attention to whether you feel comfortable or anxious. Evaluate whether the staff and other residents are friendly and inviting.
  3. Use Smell-a-vision. When you walk through the building, pay attention to the smells. You should not be able to detect any unpleasant odors. Strong “cover-up” scents are also a warning that the place likely has cleanliness issues.
  4. Look for dirt, dust, and grime in the obvious locations and places, like the baseboards and windows. You might be surprised at how many expensive assisted living centers cut corners on cleaning costs.
  5. The staff in action. Watch the staff in action, when they are interacting with the residents. Pay attention to their facial expressions and tone of voice to see if they love their jobs or are merely going through the motions. You should also observe the body language of the residents when they receive care from the staff. Look for any signs of fear, hostility, or resentment. Keep looking until you find a place where both the residents and the staff are happy, warm and friendly.
  6. The proof is in the pudding. Good food is one of the highlights for many people who reside in assisted living. Visit during mealtime and arrange to eat a meal there. Find out if the meals are both nutritious and tasty. Get a copy of the monthly menus to check for variety. Find out the center’s policy, when a resident cannot come to the dining room.
  7. Explore the both outdoor areas and the indoor facilities. Make sure that your loved one would be safe when enjoying some fresh air outside. Look to see if there are adequate sitting areas and tables.
  8. The current residents. You can find out valuable information from the people who already live at the center. Without making them feel uncomfortable, notice whether the residents are well-groomed and wearing clean clothes. Sit and visit with some residents. Let them know you are considering this community for yourself or a loved one. Ask for their advice. Find out if they have to wait a long time for personal care or other services. If so, the facility is likely under-staffed.

Use This Checklist When Visiting Assisted Living Facilities.

A Place for Mom. “Tips for Touring Assisted Living Communities.” (accessed August 7, 2019) https://www.aplaceformom.com/planning-and-advice/articles/tips-for-touring-assisted-living

 

How Will Baby Boomers Handle Long-Term Caregiving?
How Will Baby Boomers Handle Long-Term Caregiving?

How Will Baby Boomers Handle Long-Term Caregiving?

How Will Baby Boomers Handle Long-Term Caregiving?

Think Advisor’s article, “Long-Term Caregiving Realities Hit Home for Boomers” says that study participants responded that they’d be willing to do these things to provide care for a loved one:

  • Cut spending: 66%
  • Travel less frequently: 41%
  • Move to a new home: 27%
  • Work less: 27%
  • Stop working: 19%

The study also found that boomers are becoming more aware of the likelihood they’ll require retirement care, and are willing to discuss the issue. This group believed that an adult would start to need physical care or assistance at age 70 or older.

About 45% of study participants thought they’d need long-term care at some point. That number is an increase from 36% in 2013. A total of 66% of them reported that they’d had detailed conversations about how they wanted to receive long-term care. Slightly more than half said they’d had detailed conversations about how to pay for care.

How Will Baby Boomers Handle Long-Term Caregiving? About 30% of boomers in the study who were caregivers said they still had to use some retirement savings to pay for health care expenses, compared with 19% of those without caregiving responsibilities.

The U.S. Census Bureau says that older Americans are projected to outnumber children for the first time in U.S. history by 2035. This raises the question of who’ll care for the aging population.

It was no surprise that the study found that women were likelier than men to have caregiving experience. 62% of current or former caregivers among study participants were women and 38% were men. A total of 68% of those with caregiving experience said they knew about long-term care insurance, compared with 59% without such experience.

Experienced caregivers were also more likely than inexperienced boomers to have made preparations for their death. This includes communicating funeral preferences (49% vs. 41%), identifying where they wanted to be buried or cremated (51% vs. 37%) and maintaining an up-to-date estate plan (45% vs. 38%).

Reference: Think Advisor (August 8, 2019) “Long-Term Caregiving Realities Hit Home for Boomers” How Will Baby Boomers Handle “Long-Term Caregiving?