How Do I Calculate My Executor’s Fee?
How Do I Calculate My Executor’s Fee?

How Do I Calculate My Executor’s Fee?

How Do I Calculate My Executor’s Fee?

An executor’s fee is the amount of money that’s charged by the individual who’s been named or appointed as the executor of the probate estate for handling all of the necessary tasks in the probate administration.

If you’ve been appointed an executor of someone’s estate, you may be entitled to a fee for your services.

The executor or personal representative fee could be based upon a variety of factors. Some of these factors may be dependent upon the law in your state, says nj.com’s recent article, “Both of my parents died. How do I calculate the executor fee?”

In most states, the executor fee is set by statute. For example, in New Jersey, it is 5% of the first $200,000 of assets taken in by the executor, 3.5% of the next $800,000 of assets, and 2% on anything in excess of $1 million. Likewise, California has a sliding scale based on the amount of the estate.

The New York General rule. Under New York Surrogate’s Court Procedure section 2307, executor fees are based on the value of the probated estate. Fees range between 2 and 5% of the total amount of estate money the executor receives and pays out.

Under the NY Surrogate’s Court’s rules, executor fees are calculated as follows:

  • For receiving and paying out money not exceeding $100,000, the executor fee is 5%
  • For receiving and paying out additional money not exceeding $200,000 at the rate of 4%
  • For receiving and paying out additional money not exceeding $700,000 at the rate of 3%
  • For receiving and paying out additional money not exceeding $4,000,000 at the rate of 2.5%
  • For receiving and paying out all sums above $5,000,000 at the rate of 2%

However, in Minnesota and Nebraska, the law states that the fee should be “reasonable.”

The amount of work involved is determined by the specific estate. The executor is generally responsible for collecting the estate assets, paying the debts and taxes (if any) and then giving what’s remaining to the heirs.

If you elect to take the commission, it’s taxable income which must be shown on your personal income tax return.

In New Jersey, if there are co-executors, the statute says that an additional 1% can be included to the commission. However, any one executor cannot receive more than the amount to which a sole executor is entitled.

Note that the executor only receives a commission on what he or she takes control of as executor.

This means that the executor doesn’t get a commission on assets that have beneficiary designations on death or that are jointly owned with right of survivorship. These assets pass outside of the will and the executor doesn’t take possession of these assets.

How Do I Calculate My Executor’s Fee? In many instances, the probate estate of the first spouse to die is less than the second. That’s because many of the assets were held jointly with right of survivorship. As a result, they aren’t probate assets and are not subject to the commission.

If that’s the case, the commission on the first spouse’s estate would be much less than the commission on the second estate.

Reference: nj.com (October 10, 2019) “Both of my parents died. How do I calculate the executor fee?”

 

Be Prepared: Death Happens when We’re Not Looking
Death Happens when We’re Not Looking

Be Prepared: Death Happens when We’re Not Looking

Death Happens when We’re Not Looking. There are hard topics, like sickness and death, that estate planning prepares for. Then there’s the unexpected, says Wicked Local Dedham in the article “Five Things to consider before getting hit by the bus.”  Be prepared: Death Happens when We’re Not Looking. Without an estate plan in place, families have to cope with the pain of a sudden loss, in addition to managing a funeral and estate minus any advance planning. It makes a bad situation worse.

The solution is relatively simple: have an estate plan and a “just in case” plan ready.

Access to money for expenses. If your family needed to get funds to pay bills and funeral expenses, how would they do that? If you don’t have close family nearby who you can count on, who will take care of these things for you? Note that today, when most banking statements and billing payments are done online, you’ll also need to have a list of online accounts and either name someone to manage your digital property or list your passwords. Plan for how someone you trust, will access this information.

Life insurance and other assets with beneficiaries. If you have one or more life insurance policies, does anyone but you know about them? Do your beneficiaries know that they are your beneficiaries? If your employer or former employer offers life insurance, disability insurance or any other benefits, make sure that someone else besides you knows about them. If you receive a pension, does your pension get transferred to your spouse, or do the payments stop when you die? Do you know what your Social Security benefits would be to a surviving spouse, or family members?

End-of-life medical decisions. If you don’t have an Advance Directive in place, it’s time to speak with an estate planning attorney and add this to your estate plan. If you don’t have a will, Health Care Power of Attorney or other documents prepared, now would be the time to get these plans in place.

You should have a named Health Care Agent, named in your Health Care Power of Attorney, who understands your wishes for end-of-life care, if you should suffer a stroke, be critically injured in an accident or experience an illness that leaves you incapacitated. These conversations are not just for you, but for your loved ones. It will give them peace of mind to know that they are following your wishes, if a hard decision, like removing you from life support, needs to be made.

Final arrangements. Does anyone know your wishes for burial or cremation? Do you want a traditional funeral or a memorial service? Who should be notified of your passing? Making this information available for those who will be in charge, is a kindness to them. If they need to get names and emails from your computer, make sure they know how to log into your system. You could also print out a list and tell them where you are placing it.

Last will and testament. The first question is, do you have a will? The second is, does your family know where it is located? Tell your family and the person you have selected as the executor about the existence of your will, where it can be found and where other important documents are located. If you haven’t had your will created or haven’t reviewed your will in three or four years, it’s time.

Be prepared: Death Happens when We’re Not Looking. Death does not come without a lot of paperwork. For some people, a bad health diagnosis serves as a wake-up call and that’s when they decide to put their affairs in order. For others, the death of a close family member or friend is the trigger. Whatever motivates you, speak with an experienced estate planning attorney to have an estate plan created.

Reference: Wicked Local Dedham (Oct. 10, 2019) “Five Things to consider before getting hit by the bus.”

 

Can I Protect My Daughter’s Inheritance from Her Loser Husband?
Can I Protect My Daughter’s Inheritance from Her Loser Husband?

Can I Protect My Daughter’s Inheritance from Her Loser Husband?

Can I Protect My Daughter’s Inheritance from Her Loser Husband?

It’s not unusual for a parent not to fall in love with their child’s choice for a spouse. They may even go as far as to try and make certain that their daughter- or son-in-law doesn’t get their inheritance.

You can shield your money from your new son-in-law, says nj.com’s recent article “My daughter is getting married. How can I protect her inheritance?”

A good strategy is to create a trust, either as part of a will, or a living trust that would receive the estate assets for the benefit of the child and the child’s children.

A trust is a fiduciary arrangement that lets the trustee maintain trust assets, on behalf of a beneficiary or beneficiaries.

Trusts can be created in many ways and can specify precisely how and when the assets can be allowed to pass to the beneficiaries.

The trustee is a person or company that holds and administers the trust assets for the benefit of a third party. A trustee can be given a wide range of authority in the trust agreement. The trustee makes decisions in the beneficiary’s best interests, and they have a fiduciary responsibility to the trust beneficiaries.

Trust assets can be used for the health, education, maintenance and support of a child. The assets that are left over (if any) at the death of the child and any remainder are directed to go to the grandchildren outright or in trust.

Provided the assets distributed to the daughter aren’t commingled with the assets of her husband, those assets wouldn’t be subject to equitable distribution, if they couple were to one day get divorced.

The daughter can also enter into a prenuptial or postnuptial agreement. With this type of agreement, her spouse waives the right to any assets inherited by the daughter.

Talk these types of situations over with a qualified estate planning attorney.

Reference: nj.com (September 27, 2019) “My daughter is getting married. How can I protect her inheritance?”

 

Mark Twain’s Estate Plan Went South, Despite His Efforts
Mark Twain’s Estate Plan Went South, Despite His Efforts

Mark Twain’s Estate Plan Went South, Despite His Efforts

Mark Twain’s Estate Plan Went South. Despite His Efforts.
“I came in with Halley’s Comet in 1835. It is coming again next year, and I expect to go out with it. It will be the greatest disappointment of my life if I don’t go out with Halley’s Comet.” Mark Twain

Mark Twain was right. He was born the same year that Halley’s Comet appeared and he passed away one day after the comet’s closest approach to earth. A month later, his last will and testament was admitted by a Connecticut probate court appointing three friends as executor trustees to administer his estate. According to the article “Who will advocate for your estate?” appearing in 83 degrees, his choices turned out to be a terrible mistake.

Twain thought long and hard about his estate. He selected a railroad executive, a businessman and a banker to be his executors. He had two concerns: to protect his only child and sole heir, Clara Clemens, and to keep his money in the family.

He understood the complexity of his estate, which included manuscripts, stocks, bonds, copyrights, real estate, book deals and the management of The Mark Twain Company. He also knew that his daughter was a spendthrift. The three executors, he thought, would advocate for him and protect his daughter.

His trust specifically directed quarterly income payments to Clara, “free from any control or interference from any husband she may have” because of her tendency to marry, divorce and remarry.

However, three executors were not enough. One died, another quit under duress and the third was forced to resign. Without having named perpetual successor trustees to implement Twain’s wishes, the estate was up for grabs. Clara remarried and her next husband borrowed $350,000 against the estate. Clara then disinherited her own daughter before dying. This promoted Nina to file an undue influence lawsuit against her stepfather. A probate judge eventually awarded Clara’s second husband 65% of Twain’s estate for life.

Mark Twain’s Estate Plan Went South. Despite his efforts. How was it possible that this happened? Who was looking out for Mark Twain’s wishes? Sadly, no one.

Whether estates pass via a last will and testament or revocable trust, selecting the right executors and trustees—and naming successor executors and trustees–is a key step to a successful estate plan. Our heirs today include minor children, grandchildren, stepchildren, half-siblings, dysfunctional relatives and ex-spouses. The challenges they present to executors and trustees have only become more complex, since Twain’s time.

Twain had one heir, and he was aware of her weaknesses. He planned right, but selected the wrong individuals to be his executors. They were not up to the task of managing his complex estate and his daughter’s life decisions. This is a case where a professional executor and trustees would have likely been a better option.

Speak candidly with your estate planning attorney about your potential executors and trustees. Will they be able to manage the necessary decision making and personalities in your family? Consider whether an impartial and trustworthy professional might be a better option.

Reference: 83 degrees (August 27, 2019) “Who will advocate for your estate?”

 

How Do I Find a Great Estate Planning Attorney?
How Do I Find a Great Estate Planning Attorney?

How Do I Find a Great Estate Planning Attorney?

How Do I Find a Great Estate Planning Attorney?

Taking care of important estate planning tasks will limit the potential for family fighting and possible legal battles, in the event you become incapacitated, as well as after your death. An estate planning attorney can help you avoid mistakes and missteps and assist you in adjusting your plans as your individual situation and the laws change.

Next Avenue’s recent article “How to Find a Good Estate Planner” offers a few tips for finding one:

How Do I Find a Great Estate Planning Attorney? Ask for referrals from friends and family. Ask them questions about their attorney and the estate planning process. Were they satisfied with the communication they had with the attorney? Were their questions answered? Were there any concerns with the information, advice or length of time for the work to be produced?

Go with a Specialist. Not every lawyer specializes in estate planning, so look for one whose primary focus is estate and trust law in your area. After you’ve found a few possibilities, ask him or her for references. Speak to those clients to get a feel for what it will be like to work with this attorney, as well as the quality of his or her work. It is valuable to have an attorney that also handles related fields. It makes sense for an attorney that prepares wills to also handle will contests and litigation around will preparation. The litigation about preparing wills informs the internal office work and makes it more precise and more immune to family challenges.

Ask About Experience.  Ask about the attorney’s trusts-and-estates experience. Ask about the attorney’s estate planning practice and whether your situation is similar to past client experiences. Be sure your attorney can handle your situation, whether it is a complex business estate or a small businesses and family situation. If you have an aging parent, work with an elder law attorney.

Be Clear on Prices. The cost of your estate plan will depend on the complexity of your needs, your location and your attorney’s experience level. When interviewing potential candidates, ask them what they’d charge you and how you’d be charged. Some estate planning attorneys charge a flat fee. If you meet with a flat-fee attorney, ask exactly what the cost includes and ask if it’s based on a set number of visits or just a certain time period. You should also see which documents are covered by the fee and whether the fee includes the cost of any future updates. There are some estate-planning attorneys who charge by the hour.

It’s an Ongoing Relationship. See if you’re comfortable with the person you choose, because you’ll be sharing personal details of your life and concerns with them.

Ask for affiliations. Is your attorney part of the estate planning community? Your attorney should be active in the local and national estate planning scene. This way your attorney has the resources to interact with local colleagues about local issues and the ability to spot trends on a nationwide level.

Reference: Next Avenue (September 10, 2019) “How to Find a Good Estate Planner”

 

What Is a Pour-Over Will?
What Is a Pour-Over Will?

What Is a Pour-Over Will?

What Is a Pour-Over Will? If the goal of estate planning is to avoid probate, it seems counterintuitive that one would sign a will, but the pour-over will is an essential part of some estate plans, reports the Times Herald-Record’s article “Pour-over will a safety net for a living trust.”

If a person dies with assets in their name alone, those assets go through probate. The pour-over will names the trust as the beneficiary of probate assets, so the trust controls who receives the inheritance. The pour-over will works as a backup plan to the trust, and it also revokes past wills and codicils.

Living trusts became more widely used after a 1991 AARP study concluded that families should be using trusts rather than wills, and that wills were obsolete. Trusts were suddenly not just for the wealthy. Middle class people started using trusts rather than wills, to save time and money and avoid estate battles among family members. Trusts also served to keep financial and personal affairs private. Wills that are probated are public documents that anyone can review.

Even a simple probate lasts about a year, before beneficiaries receive inheritances. A trust can be settled in months. Regarding the cost of probate, it is estimated that between 2—4% of the cost of settling an estate can be saved by using a trust instead of a will.

When a will is probated, family members receive a notice, which allows them to contest the will. When assets are in a trust, there is no notification. This avoids delay, costs and the aggravation of a will contest.

Wills are not a bad thing, and they do serve a purpose. However, this specific legal document comes with certain legal requirements.

The will was actually invented more than 500 years ago, by King Henry VIII of England. Many people still think that wills are the best estate planning document, but they may be unaware of the government oversight and potential complications when a will is probated.

There are other ways to avoid probate on death. What Is a Pour-Over Will? First, when a beneficiary is added to assets like bank accounts, IRAs, life insurance policies, or stock funds, those assets transfer directly to the beneficiary upon the death of the owner. Second, when an asset is owned JTWROS, or as “joint tenants with the right of survivorship,” the ownership interest transfers to the surviving owners.

Speak with an experienced estate planning attorney to talk about how probate may impact your heirs and see if they believe the use of a trust and a pour-over will would make the most sense for your family.

Reference: Times Herald-Record (Sep. 13, 2019) “Pour-over will a safety net for a living trust.”

 

Estate Planning Is for Everyone at Every Age
Estate Planning Is for Everyone at Every Age

Estate Planning Is for Everyone at Every Age

Estate Planning Is for Everyone at Every Age.

As we go through the many milestones of life, it’s important to plan for what’s coming, and also plan for the unexpected. An estate planning attorney works with individuals, families and businesses to plan for what lies ahead, says the Cincinnati Business Courier in the article “Estate planning considerations for every stage of life.” For younger families, having an estate plan is like having life insurance: it is hoped that the insurance is never needed, but having it in place is comforting.

For others, in different stages of life, an estate plan is needed to ensure a smooth transition for a business owner heading to retirement, protecting a spouse or children from creditors or minimizing tax liability for a family.

Estate Planning Is for Everyone at Every Age: here are some milestones in life when an estate plan is needed:

Becoming an adult. It is true, for most 18-year-olds, estate planning is the last thing on their minds. However, at 18 most states consider them legal adults, and their parents no longer control many things in their lives. If parents want or need to be involved with medical or financial matters, certain estate planning documents are needed. All new adults need a general power of attorney and health care directives to allow someone else to step in, if something occurs.

That can be as minimal as a parent talking with a doctor during an office appointment or making medical decisions during a crisis. A HIPAA release should also be prepared. A simple will should be considered, especially if assets are to pass directly to siblings or a significant person in their life, to whom they are not married.

Getting married. Marriage unites individuals and their assets. For newly married couples, estate planning documents should be updated for each spouse, so their estate plans may be merged, and the new spouse can become a joint owner, primary beneficiary and fiduciary. In addition to the wills, power of attorney, healthcare directive and beneficiary designations also need to be updated to name the new spouse or a trust. This is also a time to start keeping a list of assets, in case someone needs to access accounts.

When children join the family. Whether born or adopted, the entrance of children into the family makes an estate plan especially important. Choosing guardians who will raise the children in the absence of their parents is the hardest thing to think about, but it is critical for the children’s well-being. A revocable trust may be a means of allowing the seamless transfer and ongoing administration of the family’s assets to benefit the children and other family members.

Part of business planning. Estate planning should be part of every business owner’s plan. If the unexpected occurs, the business and the owner’s family will also be better off, regardless of whether they are involved in the business. At the very least, business interests should be directed to transfer out of probate, allowing for an efficient transition of the business to the right people without the burden of probate estate administration.

If a divorce occurs. Divorce is a sad reality for more than half of today’s married couples. The post-divorce period is the time to review the estate plan to remove the ex-spouse, change any beneficiary designations, and plan for new fiduciaries. It’s important to review all accounts to ensure that any controlling-on-death accounts are updated. A careful review by an estate planning attorney is worth the time to make sure no assets are overlooked.

Upon retirement. Just before or after retirement is an important time to review an estate plan. Children may be grown and take on roles of fiduciaries or be in a position to help with medical or financial affairs. This is the time to plan for wealth transfer, minimizing estate taxes and planning for incapacity.

Reference: Cincinnati Business Courier (Sep. 4, 2019) “Estate planning considerations for every stage of life.”

 

Does a Beneficiary of an Estate Need to Live in the U.S.?
Does a Beneficiary of an Estate Need to Live in the U.S.?

Does a Beneficiary of an Estate Need to Live in the U.S.?

Does a Beneficiary of an Estate Need to Live in the U.S.?  When a person dies without a will, the distribution of his or her estate assets is governed by the state’s intestacy statute. All states have laws that instruct the court on how to disburse the intestate decedent’s property, usually according to how close in relationship they are to the person who passed away.

A recent nj.com article responded to the following question: “My ex’s new wife isn’t a citizen. Does she get an inheritance?” The article explains that under the intestacy laws of New York, for example, if the deceased had children who aren’t the children of the surviving spouse, the surviving spouse is entitled to the first $50,000.00 of the estate plus one-third of the balance of the estate.

Also, under New York law, aliens or those who are not citizens of the United States are eligible to inherit assets and the same is true for New Jersey.

In California, if you die with children but no spouse, the children inherit everything. If you have a spouse but no children, parents, siblings, or nieces or nephews, the spouse inherits everything. If you have parents but no children, spouse, or siblings, your parents inherit everything. If you have siblings but no children, spouse, or parents, those siblings inherit everything.

Also in California, if you’re married and you die without a will, what property your spouse will receive, is based in part on how the two of you owned your property. Was it separate property or community property? California is a community property state, so your spouse will inherit your half of the community property.

In that case, an ex-husband’s wife who lives in and is a citizen of the Philippines doesn’t need to be physically present in the state to inherit assets from her husband.

Does a Beneficiary of an Estate Need to Live in the U.S.? Not according to New York statutes. If the deceased owned property in the Philippines, the distribution of those assets would be according to the laws of that country.

Reference: nj.com (August 28, 2019) “My ex’s new wife isn’t a citizen. Does she get an inheritance?”

 

More Reasons to Review Your Estate Plan
More Reasons to Review Your Estate Plan

More Reasons to Review Your Estate Plan

More Reasons to Review Your Estate Plan. Every estate planning attorney will tell you that they meet with people every day, who sheepishly admit that they’ve been meaning to review their estate plan, but just haven’t gotten to it. Let the guilt go.

Attorneys know that no one wants to talk about death, taxes or illness, says Wicked Local in the article “Five Reasons to Review Your Estate Plan.” However, there are five times when even an appearance before the Queen of England has to come second to reviewing your estate plan.

You have minor children. An estate plan for a couple with young children must do two very important things: address the care and custody of minor children should both parents die and address the management and distribution of the assets that the children will inherit. The will is the estate planning document used to name a guardian for minor children. The guardian is the person who will determine where your children will live and go to school, what kind of health care they receive and make all daily decisions about their care and upbringing.

If you don’t have a will, the court will name a guardian. You may not like the court’s decision. Your children might not like it at all. Having a will takes care of this important decision.

Your estate is worth more than $1 million. While the federal estate plan exemptions currently are at levels that remove federal tax from most people’s estate planning concerns, there are still state estate taxes. Some states have inheritance taxes. Whether you are married or single, if your assets are significant, you need an estate plan that maps out how assets will be left to your heirs and to plan for taxes.

Your last estate plan was created before 2012. There have been numerous changes in state estate tax laws regarding wills, probate and trusts. This is not the only state that has seen major changes. There have been big changes in federal estate taxes. Strategies that were perfect in the past, may no longer be necessary or as productive because of these changes. While you’re making these changes, don’t forget to deal with digital assets. That includes email accounts, social media, online banking, etc. This will protect your fiduciaries from breaking federal hacking laws that are meant to protect online accounts, even when the person has your username and password.

You have robust retirement plans. Your will and trust do not control all the assets you own at the time of death. The first and foremost controlling element in your asset distribution is the beneficiary designation. Life insurance policies, annuities, and retirement accounts will be paid to the beneficiary named on the account, regardless of what your will says. Part of a comprehensive will review is to review beneficiary designations on each account.

You are worried about long-term care costs. Estate planning does not take place in a vacuum. Your estate plan needs to address issues like your plan, if you or your spouse need care. Do you intend to stay in your home? Are you going to move to live closer to your children, or to a Continuing Care Retirement Community? Do you have long-term insurance in place? Do you want to plan for Medicaid eligibility?

All of these issues need to be considered when reviewing and updating your estate plan. If you’ve never had an estate plan created, this is the time. Put your mind at ease, by getting this off your “to do” list and contact an experienced estate planning attorney.

Reference: Wicked Local (Aug. 29, 2019) “Five Reasons to Review Your Estate Plan”

 

Can Charles Manson’s Heirs Get Profits from “Once Upon A Time…In Hollywood”?
Can Charles Manson’s Heirs Get Profits from “Once Upon A Time…In Hollywood”?

Can Charles Manson’s Heirs Get Profits from “Once Upon A Time…In Hollywood”?

Can Charles Manson’s Heirs Get Profits from “Once Upon A Time…In Hollywood”? The Quentin Tarantino movie, starring Brad Pitt, Leonard DiCaprio, and Margot Robbie, features the Manson killings and ends with a shocking bloodbath 50 years after the grisly murders.

Wealth Advisor’s recent article, “Charles Manson’s grandson can profit off of Once Upon a Time…In Hollywood,” also notes that the movie prominently features a song called “Look at Your Game, Girl,” written by aspiring songwriter Charles Manson before his followers’ murderous spree. The tune is sung a cappella by girls in Manson’s ‘family,’ as they walk through Los Angeles and forage for food.

Tarantino said that he only used Manson’s music, after assuring himself that his family wouldn’t benefit, and that royalties and licensing fees would go to the victims’ families. However, since the movie was released, controversy has exploded and a DailyMail.com investigation has discovered the issue around Manson’s music is far more complicated and likely to wind up in court.

“Quentin told friends that he struggled with the decision to use Manson’s music, and only agreed to use it after being assured that any money from its use would go to the victims’ families,” a movie insider told DailyMail.com

Mary Ramos, music supervisor on the film, agreed, noting “Even considering using that, we wanted to find out … what happens if this is used, where the money goes. And there was a trust set up for the victims, and no-one even associated with the Mansons and the Manson family makes money off that song.”

Manson had initially visited director Roman Polanski’s home in 1968 search of Hollywood legend Doris Day’s music producer son Terry Melcher, who had talked about giving Manson a recording deal. Manson was upset that Melcher changed his mind on the contract, and discovered that he no longer lived at the house.

On August 8, 1969, Manson ordered family devotees Charles ‘Tex’ Watson, Patricia Krenwinkel and Susan Atkins to return to the house and kill everyone inside, including actress Sharon Tate, Polanski’s wife.

Fast forward a few decades. Guns N’ Roses recorded Manson’s song “Look at Your Game, Girl” on the hit album ‘The Spaghetti Incident?’ that went platinum in 1993. Lawyer Nathaniel Friedman, who filed a 1971 wrongful death suit for one of the victim’s grandchildren, negotiated a lucrative settlement with the band.

However, that wrongful death judgment wasn’t extended, and eventually the rights to profits from Manson’s music reverted to the killer’s family, although that led to a bitter fight when Manson died in prison in 2017, at age 83. There were two men who claimed to be Manson’s biological sons. Another man said he was Manson’s biological grandson, and a friend claimed to have been bequeathed Manson’s estate in his final will.

Can Charles Manson’s Heirs Get Profits from “Once Upon A Time…In Hollywood”? After a long legal battle, Manson’s grandson, Jason Freeman, won and was given permission to take possession of the killer’s remains in March 2018. However, there’s still a fight ongoing over who will inherit the Manson estate. However, Freeman will most likely prevail, given his early success. As a result, any royalties, licensing fees, or profits from the use of Manson’s song in “Once Upon A Time…In Hollywood” probably will go to Manson’s grandson.

Reference: Wealth Advisor (August 27, 2019) “Charles Manson’s grandson can profit off of Once Upon a Time…In Hollywood”