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Elder Law Estate Planning

Why Should I Create a Trust If I’m Not Rich?

“Your true assets are the collections of your quality moments on the earth.”
― Amit Ray, Mindfulness Living in the Moment – Living in the Breath

Carve your name on hearts, not tombstones. A legacy is etched into the minds of others and the stories they share about you. —Shannon Adler

It’s probably not high on your list of fun things to do, considering the way in which your assets will be distributed, when you pass away. However, consider the alternative, which could be family battles, unnecessary taxes and an extended probate process. These issues and others can be avoided by creating a trust.

Barron’s recent article, “Why a Trust Is a Great Estate-Planning Tool — Even if You’re Not Rich,” explains that there are many types of trusts, but the most frequently used for these purposes is a revocable living trust. This trust allows you—the grantor—to specify exactly how your estate will be distributed to your beneficiaries when you die, and at the same time avoiding probate and stress for your loved ones.

When you speak with an estate planning attorney about setting up a trust, also ask about your will, healthcare directives, a living will and powers of attorney.

Your attorney will have retitle your probatable assets to the trust. This includes brokerage accounts, real estate, jewelry, artwork, and other valuables. Your attorney can add a pour-over will to include any additional assets in the trust. Retirement accounts and insurance policies aren’t involved with probate, because a beneficiary is named.

While you’re still alive, you have control over the trust and can alter it any way you want. You can even revoke it altogether.
A revocable trust doesn’t require an additional tax return or other processing, except for updating it for a major life event or change in your circumstances. The downside is because the trust is part of your estate, it doesn’t give much in terms of tax benefits or asset protection. If that was your focus, you’d use an irrevocable trust. However, once you set up such a trust it can be difficult to change or cancel. The other benefits of a revocable trust are clarity and control— you get to detail exactly how your assets should be distributed. This can help protect the long-term financial interests of your family and avoid unnecessary conflict.

If you have younger children, a trust can also instruct the trustee on the ages and conditions under which they receive all or part of their inheritance. In second marriages and blended families, a trust removes some of the confusion about which assets should go to a surviving spouse versus the children or grandchildren from a previous marriage.

Trusts can have long-term legal, tax and financial implications, so it’s a good idea to work with an experienced estate planning attorney.

Reference: Barron’s (February 23, 2019) “Why a Trust Is a Great Estate-Planning Tool — Even if You’re Not Rich

If you ask yourself “should Create a Trust If I’m not Rich?” then these are the answers for you.

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Elder Law Estate Planning Guardianship

What a Durable Power of Attorney Can Do?

“Make sure you visualize what you really want, not what someone else wants for you.” Jerry Gillies

“No one is useless in this world who lightens the burdens of another.” Charles Dickens

Helping aging parents with daily tasks can become a challenge, if the parent has limited mobility. A trip to the bank, for example, will require coordinating the adult child’s responsibilities with the aging parent’s limitations. If the parent has more energy in the morning, for instance, but the adult child is working, this can become a bigger challenge than if the adult child can go to the bank on behalf of the parent, when it’s convenient for them — at a lunch break, for instance.

In this situation, as noted in The Daily Sentinel’s article “Tools to help your aging parent,” having a durable power of attorney will help. This type of power of attorney is a legal document that permits a child or other named individual to handle certain responsibilities, like banking. Granting a power of attorney to a child doesn’t mean giving up total control, which is often a concern of aging parents. It simply means that the child is now legally allowed to handle these tasks.

What a Durable Power of Attorney Can Do? A durable power of attorney is different than the “general medical power of attorney.” As implied by its name, this is limited to making decisions about the parent’s health care and is usually used only when the parent is not able to make these decisions on their own.

There are more serious situations, where neither of these types of power of attorney is enough, such as when the parent lacks capacity because of dementia or a medical decision. It is necessary to protect the parent from themselves or anyone who might try to take advantage of their lack of clear mental capacity. This may require that an adult child needs to be appointed as a guardian for their parent.

Being appointed a guardian can be a very emotional event, since the parent and child are not just switching emotional roles, but legal roles. The parent no longer has the capacity to make significant decisions, because a court has found that they no longer have that ability.

You may have heard the term “conservatorship” used. It is similar to guardianship, except that the conservatorship only allows for control over the parent’s financial affairs.

Guardianship is taken very seriously, as it should be. This removes an adult’s right to make any kind of decision on their own. In some states, including Colorado, the court must first be convinced that the parent is unable to effectively receive or evaluate information or to make or communicate decisions. They must be deemed incapacitated, before guardianship can be established. Once that standard has been met, then guardianship is established. If there is a doubt about incapacity, then no guardianship will be established, and the family is faced with finding other ways to help the aging parent.

What a Durable Power of Attorney Can Do is allow parents and their children to face many issues that are best addressed before incapacity becomes an issue. If the family does not have a plan for the aging parent’s care, it is recommended that the family make an appointment with an estate planning attorney to discuss the various options.

Reference: The Daily Sentinel (March 24, 2019) “Tools to help your aging parent”

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